Where are affordable apartments in Denver

Because there really are so many varieties, we’ve picked only the neighborhoods closest to the city center.

LoDo: Ah, the stately orchid. Lower Downtown (get it now, dontcha?) perches on the park-lined Platte River. Close to Union Station, Coors Field, MCAD (the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver), and the Auraria Campus (an educational facility housing three public universities), LoDo leaves little for want. Parking is crazy, and crazy expensive, so find a complex with a private garage if possible. Unsurprisingly, this zone has the highest rates in town. Don’t get your hopes up for anything less than $900/month for a studio, $1650/month for a two-bedroom unit. This is also a relatively pet-friendly area. Unless your beloved Fido is smaller than the average carry-on luggage item—and you don’t mind paying an extra fee—look elsewhere.

Uptown/Capitol Hill: Each portion of this neighborhood borders the central business district, making the iris a perfect example for it. Irises look a lot like orchids, but (due to being more common), they brag a slightly lower price tag. $800-$900/month for a spacious studio to enjoy the urban residential feel of Uptown. If you care to mix this sentiment with historic architecture; and higher population density, skip south to Capitol Hill. Cap Hill has a young, energetic, pedestrian-friendly feel—although if you’re not looking to extend your college years into professional adulthood, you may find the neighbors tiresome, despite their “eccentricity.” $700/month all-inclusive studio near Wax Trax Records is the low end. More pet friendly than LoDo.

Five Points: You’d do well to call this one the desert sage. Its close-in location makes this neighborhood prime fodder for urban renewal. Great access to downtown with a fraction of the action. (In other words: perfect for commuters!) Lots of stand-alone homes converted to duplexes and single-accommodation apartments, some of which go for as little as $825/month (for a whole house?!), but some as much as $1500/month (2nd floor converted executive condo). Expect the deposit to match the monthly rent.

East Denver: The multicolored gazania represents this strange conglomeration of communities. Park Hill is the first intentional interracial neighborhood, and Congress Park was gentrified long ago. The latter is jealously close to the Botanic Gardens and Cheesman Park. Both neighborhoods are vying to be considered part of the proper “midtown” section of Denver, and new apartment complexes will reflect this competitive stance in their rates. A two-bedroom townhouse in Park Hill ought to run you $1400-$1600/month, but that will likely include a pool and gym access. It’s easier to find single apartments in Congress Park, which should cost $600-$800/month and require a 12-month lease.

Washington Park and Baker: Washington Park is as all-American as the sunflower. Imagine “Life is Good”-clad parents training for marathons with their wee ones in the stroller, careening down a beautiful, tree-lined street. This perfect portrait is gonna cost, ya, though: expect around $800-1000/month for a single duplex apartment complete with washer and dryer and an assigned parking spot. The historic Baker neighborhood, on the other hand, sits west of Washington Park and boasts dive bars and dirty music venues. Here’s South Denver’s veritable cactus. It doesn’t get any edgier than setting off to thrift the S. Broadway strip. $650/month for a two bedroom apartment sets the bottom range; a single room in a renovated Victorian, however, can cost you that much alone.

Lincoln Park: The dahlia of Denver, Lincoln Park is awesome. Revitalization work is well underway which would turn this close-in neighborhood into a cultural hub. That said, it’s not there yet…So be wary and check the digs out thoroughly. Inexpensive rent here (some single units $500/month), but you’re usually looking at an older complex.

Highlands: At long last! The coveted rose. The Highlands enclave has become incredibly popular in recent years, as it combines the amenities of the other close-in neighborhoods without the parking problem of LoDo.. Sitting just across I-25 from downtown, Highlands consists of pockets of boutiques and pubs, solid restaurants with local flavor and heaps of diverse housing. $800/month for a one bedroom luxury apartment; $1400/month for a three-bedroom ranch house. And everyone has a dog or baby, according to his or her preference!

The best way to find an apartment in Denver is simply to go meandering in this sunny wonderland yourself. Just don’t get distracted and try to bed down in one of the many glorious parks—that’s still illegal, even in Denver. Good luck, dear hopeful Coloradoan. Recall the words of our patron saint: “Sunshine on my shoulders makes me happy…”

Now go getcha some!